I could've danced all night...

I could've danced all night...

310 notes

To reach puberty and find oneself falling in love with members of one’s own sex is to experience a mixture of self-discovery and self-disgust that never leaves a human consciousness. If the stigma is attached not simply to an obviously random characteristic, such as skin pigmentation, but to the deepest desires of the human heart, then it can eat away at a person’s sense of his own dignity with peculiar ferocity. When a young person confronts her sexuality, she is also completely alone. A young heterosexual black or Latino girl invariably has an existing network of people like her to interpret, support, and explain the emotions she feels when confronting racial prejudice for the first time. But a gay child generally has no one. The very people she would most naturally turn to — the family — may be the very people she is most ashamed in front of.

The stigma attached to sexuality is also different that that attached to race because it attacks the very heart of what makes a human being human: her ability to love and be loved. Even the most vicious persecution of racial minorities allowed, in many cases, for the integrity of the marital bond or the emotional core of a human being. When it did not, when Nazism split husbands from wives, children from parents, when apartheid or slavery broke up familial bonds, it was clear that a particularly noxious form of repression was taking place. But the stigma attached to homosexuality begins with such a repression. It forbids, at a child’s earliest stage of development, the possibility of the highest form of human happiness. It starts with emotional terror and ends with mild social disapproval. It’s no accident that later in life, when many gay people learn to reconnect the bonds of love and sex, they seek to do so in private, even protected from the knowledge of their family.

In his seminal seminal essay published on May 10, 1993, Andrew Sullivan poignantly observes the difference between oppression based on sexual orientation and oppression based on skin color. (via explore-blog)

Wow. An insightful view.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

748 notes

explore-blog:

Ellen DeGeneres is … almost a litmus test of where we have been as a society. When she first came out and really put the issue of same-sex partnerships on people’s agendas, and I mean people who really wouldn’t have thought about it, I think the country was still in a very different state.
NPR on how Ellen DeGeneres helped change cultural sentiment about LGBT rights.

Nothing is certain but change…or something like that right?

explore-blog:

Ellen DeGeneres is … almost a litmus test of where we have been as a society. When she first came out and really put the issue of same-sex partnerships on people’s agendas, and I mean people who really wouldn’t have thought about it, I think the country was still in a very different state.

NPR on how Ellen DeGeneres helped change cultural sentiment about LGBT rights.

Nothing is certain but change…or something like that right?

(Source: , via explore-blog)

Filed under equality NPR change

635 notes

they love what you’re doing; they hate that it’s not them.
oh jealousy…that’s why I’m in the gym all week. I want bitches to be jealous :)

they love what you’re doing; they hate that it’s not them.

oh jealousy…that’s why I’m in the gym all week. I want bitches to be jealous :)

(Source: txnx)

911 notes

"you can retake a class, but you can’t relive a party."
I heard this from a girl i went to high school with. I’m all over the place cause I want to do it all, see it all, live it all. That’s what my plan is: do it all or go down trying.

"you can retake a class, but you can’t relive a party."

I heard this from a girl i went to high school with. I’m all over the place cause I want to do it all, see it all, live it all. That’s what my plan is: do it all or go down trying.

(Source: txnx)